Wildlife

Wildlife

Despite once being a land fill refuse tip and being surrounded by urban development Clennon Valley provides part of a green corridor for wildlife almost from the coast to the countryside via Paignton Zoo. The Lakes are part of this corridor and are used by many species, either resident, seasonal visitors or transient.

Birds: The bird population have been well recorded over the years with many rarities and scarcities visiting the Lakes several species rarely or never seen in any other part of Torbay. The most popular residents are Mute Swan, Mallard, Moorhen, Coot, Grey Heron. From late summer to early spring regularly seen birds are Kingfishers, Teal, Water Rail (more often heard grunting and squealing in the reeds) and Snipe. During the Summer Reed Warbler song bubbles away in the reedbed, with Chiffchaff and Blackcap singing from the surrounding scrub, overhead Swallows, Swift and House Martin sometimes skim over the lakes to take a drink or catch emerging insects. Twenty one nestboxes were put up in 2015 - the results in the first year were 63 young Blue Tits and Great Tits being fledged!

Mammals: Ten or more species of bat have been recorded around the Lakes and woodlands. Badger, Fox, Stoat, Bank Vole, Field Mouse, Rabbit Mole, Common and even Water Shrew are just some of the species that are resident around the Lakes. Mink used to be regular and Otter has visited the lakes in recent years.

Reptiles & Amphibians: Slow Worm, Common Frog and Toad, Common Newt are the most regularly seen. Grass Snake and Common Lizard used to be regular but have been rarely seen in the last 5 years. Adder is a declining species that has been found around the meadow areas.

Insects: During the summer months a good selection of Dragonflies, Damselflies and even the Beautiful Demoiselle hawk around the lakes and scrub. Over 20 Species of Butterfly can be seen during most years the highlights being Brown Argus, Brown Hairstreak and Marbled White. Some more work on the wild meadow areas should increase the number and variety.

 

The Friends Group requires an entomologist to carry out more detailed recording.

 

Local Inhabitants